naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (Default)
I just uploaded a bunch of autumn photos to my Flickr account... Autumn Leaves and Nests.

Ahhhhh, autumn. Gorgeous.
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (path less traveled)
I can never figure out quite how to start a new entry here when I haven't updated in such a long time... I'll try to at least mention the big events of the past few months.

The lovely contract sysadmin documentation job I began last spring has metamorphosed into a "real job"... I'm now part of USC's ITS department.

This has meant that I just couldn't manage the commute and time required to stay with the MSIS program at Claremont, though. I can't decide whether to think of this as a hiatus, a sabbatical, or a leave of absence from grad school.

Being laid off from Caltech formerly-ITS-now-IMSS last October sucked in a lot of ways, and removed certain possible paths from my life, but it did open others. It's hard to believe it's been almost a year.

It's a little bit of broken deja vu to be surrounded by Trojan iconography in cardinal and gold these days, since my high school mascot was a Trojan in red and white, followed by over a decade of being surrounded by Caltech hazard-orange and white.

It's autumn, which always means facing transitions and saying farewell to the past for me, but I seem to be in the midst of a soul-deep Must Simplify, Must Actively Transition With Intent phase than usual for the time of year.

I had an amazing, amazing time in July vacationing with my parents and backpacking with my father. I'm still in the process of organizing umptymillion photos and writing up a trip report from my handwritten journal entries. Gosh, the wild spaces of the Pacific Northwest are incredible. Southern California is far too dry and doesn't have enough trees by comparison.

My last remaining grandparent passed away this summer. It feels odd how family dynamics change and don't change as we all face these milestones in our lives. I was able to make it to rural Wisconsin for the family gathering for Gramma's funeral, and though it was a difficult time, it was wonderful to see everyone. Distances make everything so much harder.

I may be attending my 15th high school reunion in Indiana near Thanksgiving.

There's a possibility that I may be attending the LISA 2006 sysadmin conference in Washington, D.C., during the first week of December.

Every day is filled with so many little things, and big things masquerading as little things, and little things masquerading as big things... and still the wheel turns. It's been a doozie of a year.

Unrelated geeky question: is anyone using http://www.librarything.com/ and/or http://lib.rario.us/ and if so, are you in any way unhappy/dissatisfied with either one?
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (autumn bountiful harvest)
The sunrise is really beautiful again this morning. For the past year or more I've been quite the night owl, but over the past few months I've been waking just before dawn, and enjoying the sunrises.

The sky is really, really gorgeous just as the first tinges of orange line the horizon.

Right now I'm sitting near an east-facing window with my laptop and a mug of hot chai... now that I'm at home more I'm experimenting with a few types of chai trying to find one with comforting/addictive properties similar to the sort I used to buy at Broad Cafe every few mornings or so.

I've gradually been importing all of my music CDs into iTunes, and from there to my iPod, so my laptop is currently shuffling through my Battlefield Band tunes.

I adore the Battlefield Band. I have ever since I heard one of their appearances on A Prairie Home Companion when I was in middle school, listening to it on WFYI with my parents. They played a handful of strathspeys and reels and had folks practically dancing in the aisles, and played some mournful ballads, and their sensibilities blended so well with Garrison Keillor's own particular brand of humor... each of the musicians introduced himself, and explained what musical instruments they played... traditional Scottish tin whistles, traditional Scottish drums like the bodhran, traditional Scottish bagpipes, traditional Scottish synthesizers... made from traditional Scottish plastic...

And then they announced that they were going to play a surfing song from the Outer Hebrides.

There was a dramatic pause.

Then, they launched into Bad Moon Rising, on the fiddle and the bagpipes.

I adore it. Dad had made a cassette tape of the broadcast, and I made a copy... I listened to it so much I wore the cassette out. And I made another copy.

I still have it here in my two tubs of cassette tapes. But I also have a large number of their CDs, including On The Rise (Amazon will let you listen to a snippet here if you have Windows Media Player), which has Bad Moon Rising on it, along with After Hours, another of my favorites. Their music is also available direct from Temple Records' online web storefront, which has a bigger selection of their CDs than Amazon, as well as a number of free MP3 downloads.

I've yet to find a Battlefield Band song I dislike. Some are very mellow, others are dancably peppy, others are melancholy to the point where if I'm having a really down day I don't want to listen to them or they'll worsen my mood, but I love them all.

I only wish more of the recordings of their music had Alan Reid's introductions to the songs. He has the most amazing sense of humor...

A dear friend of mine went to extraordinary effort to remind me to attend their recent performance at Beckman Auditorium on November 5th. I'm so grateful, because the joy I found within myself during the performance has rattled around in my head and... I don't know... maybe the echoes are reverberating in my soul. Or something like that.

By the way, the Battlefield Band's website says that they're going to be appearing on A Prairie Home Companion again on November 26th. :-)

Lately I've been... I don't know what the right word is... transforming, awakening, reawakening... and reconnecting with what brings me real joy. Some little things, some big things, some nostalgic things which have been present in my life before and now are returning in a new form, some things which in the past I've known I wanted but for various perfectly reasonable reasons set those insights and desires aside temporarily, and some new things which somehow feel like I'm returning home when I find them.

In some climates, autumn is a time of harvest and endings, of the world going dormant and resting as the temperature drops and the soil rests. The plants and animals conserve their energy for the rough, dark months ahead, or hibernate through the winter. I know those lessons. But here in southern California, in the urban jungle of Los Angeles, the bulbs I've planted in the pots on my porch are just sending up new shoots, and the fiery colors of the gum tree leaves are falling onto the brightening green of new grass.

I've said this before elsewhere, but something about this place, this climate, makes it difficult to note time passing. If the turn of the seasons is as subtle as it is here, and the bright sunshine and seventy-two degree days come one after the other after the other, people's time-sense can become so skewed. Some things from a decade ago feel as though they happened yesterday, and it is so easy to put off large goals until tomorrow because yesterday was so like today.

But watching the stars and planets overhead during the dark nights, far above the twinkling of the city lights and the neverending flow of the freeways... watching the sunrise as day after day the sun springs over the horizon in a slightly different spot, watching the plants and listening to the change in the wind... time speaks differently here, but it is speaking, just as it speaks everywhere.

I'm also starting to experiment with podcasts... one of my favorites is another gem I first found on National Public Radio... Stardate is a short astronomy update. You can now listen to it online or as a podcast, or you can read it daily via an RSS feed (here on LiveJournal it's available via [livejournal.com profile] stardateorg).

Somehow I'm fitting my song of new beginnings, farewell to endings, and insights into myself and the world into this sunny autumn. The horizon's orange edge has brightened to bright pale blue, and the sun rises, accompanied by fiddles and bagpipes.

Good morning!
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (autumn bountiful harvest)
I fell asleep last night to the sound of thunder, and occasional cloudbursts dumping down onto the roof.

This is a big deal... it hasn't really rained in Burbank since... um... last spring sometime. April? I think?

The streets are slick with the summer's oil and whatnot, and of course the freeways are a bit of a mess. In the city areas where there aren't enough actual soil and there's just too much pavement and concrete, the city smells... kind of an industrial-modern-tired smell. And I'm worried about the ceiling of my bedroom, where the new roof the apartment complex put on a year and a half ago leaked during last year's rainy season. (So far, there's no leaks, but I'm going to watch it like a hawk for the next few days!)

But here on campus where there's green areas everywhere possible, the plants and the soil and the misty air just smell lovely... like earth waking up.

It's wonderful.

For the past week or so there was a change in the air, a change in the smell and sound and feel... autumn is coming.

Of course, I couldn't miss that fact for other reasons... with all of the new students arriving on campus, and I've trying to get all of their computer accounts set up and their orientation information ready etc etc etc, but... the natural cues of the season change speak louder to me than the man-made schedules.

The wheel turns, and it's wonderful.
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (spring valley)
I'm currently having a pot of Burnside Winter Frost, from Infusions of Tea. I brew it fairly weak... if I make my black teas too strong you'd be peeling me off the ceiling before lunchtime. :-P But gosh, I love this stuff. I got this Burnside a year or so ago. Every single tea I've ever bought from them has been utterly fabulous. My favorite is still Tidal Wave, but... I left my window open last night and woke up a bit chilly, so today, it's this lovely black tea that tastes vaguely... well, to me, anyway... like curling up under a quilt in front of a woodstove, as blustery grey clouds chase each other across the horizon. I popped some wildflower honey from last summer from Bill's Bees into it, and ahhhhhhhhhh.

Of course, the sun is rising and it looks like it's going to be another 72-and-sunny day in beautiful downtown Burbank, but that's just fine, too.
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (autumn bountiful harvest)
Been meaning to update here more often, but...

...if wishes were horses then beggars would ride, or something like that, right?

Had a lovely holiday weekend. We roasted four whole chickens over the past four days, made five different kinds of stuffing, and had a total of three Thanksgiving dinners that couldn't be beat, not counting the leftovers noshing. I listened to Alice's Restaurant. We had friends over. We boiled the remains of the roasted chickens and made homemade soup stock to stash in the freezer. We took down our autumn, Samhain, Halloween and Thanksgiving decorations, and began putting up our winter, Yule, and Christmas decorations. I saved more holiday music from my CDs into my home 'puter, and moved the subwoofer and one set of speakers from my bedroom to the living room, so now I can pipe playlists there, which is especially good since my stereo out there is on its last legs. The stereo up in the loft still works nicely, of course, but there's something to be said for programming a playlist of many, many hours of custom-mixed music, you know? I love the holiday music I have on CD...

I started getting organized for The Holiday Card-Mailing Adventure of 2004. I'm really glad I keep buying cards in January every year... I have a sizeable stash of them, though it's taken me a few months to figure out where I'd squirreled them all away this time, since 2003 was pretty much utter chaos, the few years before that weren't all that much better, and moving last April just let the disorganization reign a while longer.

Which reminds me... if you suspect that I may have lost your current address, or never had it to begin with, please email me at adele @ shakal.org so I have a chance at keeping my rolodex thing up to date!

I actually went to Fry's early in the morning on Black Friday because one of the friends we had visiting this weekend is very good with computer hardware installation and repair, and I needed a few specific bits for the project I needed her help with. It wasn't bad... well, I had fun, anyway. It was a chill, foggy morning, and Fry's opened at 6am. I got there at 6:30 and spent about 45 minutes waiting in line to get into the store, a half hour finding what I wanted, and another 45 minutes waiting to check out. I thanked every retail worker I bumped into for working that day. In retrospect, I should have worn my santa hat. That would have been even more fun! Then I stopped at Trader Joe's to replenish provisions for one of the feasts, and picked up a lovely and lovely-smelling wreath for which I still need to get an over-door hanger. But it smells really great!

I started working on my wishlist for this year, since Thanksgiving is the time my parents and I always did that when I was younger. I'm almost done with it; I'll probably post it tomorrow.

I spent some time on my projects-and-purchases gift list for others, too. Wow, do I need to do a lot of crocheting this month...

I spent some time going through three boxes of computer-related clutter in my room, though I'm still working on the Great Decluttering and Simplification of 2004. I did a bit of work, too, because I didn't get to all of the items on last week's to-do list for work, and deadlines are looming.

Oh, that's right... I didn't mention my latest effort to get organized at work here! I've been feeling really, really swamped lately, and last week, after being inspired by [livejournal.com profile] yesthattom's time management tutorial at LISA, I took all of the random lists and scraps of paper and random things I've been worrying about for work lately, and made a big list of all of it. Then I shuffled things around according to importance and deadlines and broke it up into weekly lists from last week until the end of December, and monthly lists for all of next year. Yes, I was carrying around an index of some stuff I need to do next year in my head! Yeesh. No wonder I've been feeling miserable.

Anyway, it turns out to be eight pages when I print out the HTML file. But that's OK. At least it's not rattling around in my skull making me miserable. I printed it out and chopped it up into the weekly and monthly lists and stuck it up on my bulletin board at my desk, and kept last week's list on the desk right beneath my monitor. I got almost everything on last week's list done (except for the items I took home this weekend), which was rather shocking, actually. So now I'm just finishing the things I took home and did some of this weekend, and then starting in on this week's list.

I used to do this sort of thing all the time. I don't know when or why I fell out of the habit, but I'm going to do the 21-day habit-forming thing and get back on the wagon.

After all, there's a saying in Dad's family: "Hitch your wagon to a star, bust your butt and there you are!"

I had apple-cranberry pie for breakfast, and now I have hot chai tea, which smells and tastes wonderful, I'm listening to Vivaldi's Four Seasons, and I know exactly what I need to get done at work today.

It's a good morning!
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (Default)
I love this time of year!

Here is my entry from a year ago.

This season, I find myself thinking not only of those who have gone before, relatives, friends and strangers, who have inspired me or given me guidance or simply made me think... but also of the parts of me which came before, the facets of myself which found expression during the past year, the facets which caused me pain, the facets which brought me joy. I'm trying to learn from them all, and I bid farewell to the aspects which are waning, hoping my path is clearing some of them this turn along the circle yet knowing I'll miss others. I myself try to clear the way to greet aspects waxing... some I am hoping for, anticipating, looking forward to, trying to encourage... and at the same time I try to be open to unexpected surprises.

There's a joyful chorus going on.

The veil between past and present, between what was and what is and what may be, shimmers this night, this season. Apple pies and pumpkin bread and spiced cider and scones with berry preserves and golden honey celebrate the bounty of the year's growth.

The wheel turns.
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (Default)
...a purring cat

...Traditional Medicinals herbal tea

...the feel of yarn sliding between my fingers

...a smooth crochet hook

...handknitted socks (Roommate makes the most comfortable feet-shaped socks I've ever worn using Plymouth Yarn's Sockotta)

...comfy dry Birki-clogs for tramping about in puddles without getting my feet wet (they're a dozen years old and get worn every rainy season)

...a relatively calm drive to work (surface streets from Burbank to the 134, skipping the 5 entirely) in a dependable car

...a cinnamon-raisin bagel for breakfast, and a blueberry bagel for brunch

...comfy Birkenstock sandals to wear in the office (that reminds me, I need to seal the cork on them again, and get them re-soled)

...a soft mock-turtleneck with printed leaves all over it

...an autumn walk under a cheery umbrella

...water lilies blossoming, surrounded by ripples from raindrops on the water

...being able to see my breath in the chill air

...shining water droplets clinging to the underside of agapanthus leaves

...a cup of warm chicken chili soup from Broad Cafe for lunch

...the fresh smell of earth under drizzling rain

...seven years of working at ITS

...and a snug cozy home waiting for me.

ETA: And online traffic speed maps to figure out the best way home.

ETA later: And wow, homemade chicken soup with onions and carrots when I get home. What an amazing day.
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (Default)
I got a bit of inspiration last Tuesday, and asked Roommate to celebrate autumn with me...

Harvest Moon Soup

Sizzled in the bottom of a Really Big Soup Pot:
chopped leek
garlic
dash of olive oil

Then added:
small bit of water
onion flakes
chopped carrots

The moon was rising yellow in the dark clear sky over the mountains east of us as we were chopping.

Steamed in the microwave in a covered casserole after being lopped in half and cleaned of seeds:
one harlequin winter squash

Dumped into the Really Big Soup Pot after the onion flakes looked happily hydrated:
tomato puree
water
handfuls of baby orange lentils
big dash of paprika
dash of coarse ground black pepper
dash of dried basil
dash of celery flakes
tiny dash of savory
tiny dash of thyme
two bay leaves
chicken bullion to taste

While the pot was working its way to a good boil, I scooped the cooked squash out of its skin and popped it into the blender with a bit of water to puree. Then I added that to the pot and let it simmer for a bit.

Sliced into rectangles and cubes and presented in a really big bowl:
potato-rosemary bread
sun-dried tomato bread
another random herby bread that had looked good when I'd stopped at Berolina's on the way home

The thick, hearty soup didn't look like it had quite as many colors as I'd wanted, so I added frozen vegetables (mostly corn and peas), and brought that back to a quick boil only briefly so the peas didn't lose their bright color.

We served it in our huge soup bowls using the bread cubes for garnish and dunking, with Martinelli's apple-cranberry in sparkling wine glasses. By the time we sat down to eat the moon was shiny and bright, and clouds were moving in, looking beautiful and mysterious. It was a marvelous cozy evening at home, and around midnight I wrote...

Autumn sweeps in
a silent wind high above
dancing past the clouded moon.


Here's to autumn!
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (Default)
I got my brochure for LISA 2004 this week, and finally had time to look through it last evening. I haven't been to LISA in a few years for various reasons. I'm not looking forward to so much travel in November, but dang... it looks fabulous. Gotta try to get into [livejournal.com profile] yesthattom's sessions.

[livejournal.com profile] src just posted a cool mention of the comic strip User Friendly. I don't read it regularly, but I love that comic. I went backward to this strip from August 21st to find the beginning of this story arc, and then read forward. Hee! Penguins and parachute drops and SP2 in Antarctica! Whee! And it's even more cool knowing that the caricatures of folks depicted there are in some way based on the real people that are working there.

About a week ago, Roommate and I made a mushroom/onion/asparagus soup which turned out very tasty and very interestingly colored. We've named it Tourmaline Soup and here's how we made it (I've already forgotten some of the details, but I don't want to forget any more)...

Sizzled in the bottom of a big soup pot:
large bits of chopped purple onion
chopped leek greens
garlic
dash of olive oil

Added water, large bits of chopped mushrooms (we used oyster, baby portabello, and white button, I think... most were fresh from Ranch 99 but some were Trader Joes freeze-dried, which needed to be soaked briefly in water before chopping), a dash of dried basil, thyme, and celery flakes, and a bit of chicken and beef bullion to taste. I can't remember if I dropped in a bay leaf or not.

We had a bag of frozen asparagus spears and the mushrooms looked lonely, so we cut those to about two inches long and added them. I also popped in some enoki mushrooms. Simmered briefly to make sure the asparagus cooked to just-crunchy-to-bite-into... we didn't want soggy spears!

The asparagus turned the broth greenish, and the onions and mushrooms soaked it up so their color turned into odd purple-and-green stripes. Hence the reference to tourmaline.

I think we served this in our giant big bowls over separately cooked noodles, and we had some leftover cheese... German butterkase or baby Swiss bits looked pretty as garnish sprinkled on top.

I need to type up how we made our Harvest Moon Soup, too.
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (reflective)
My Sorrow, when she's here with me,
  Thinks these dark days of autumn rain
Are beautiful as days can be;
She loves the bare, the withered tree;
  She walks the sodden pasture lane.

Her pleasure will not let me stay.
  She talks and I am fain to list:
She's glad the birds are gone away,
She's glad her simple worsted gray
  Is silver now with clinging mist.

The desolate, deserted trees,
  The faded earth, the heavy sky,
The beauties she so truly sees,
She thinks I have no eyes for these,
  And vexes me for reason why.

Not yesterday I learned to know
  The love of bare November days
Before the coming of the snow,
But it were vain to tell her so,
  And they are better for her praise.


Each season has a beauty of its own, and each feeling has its own strengths to savor, the bitter with the sweet, the bustle of busy projects, the fallow calm, the warmth of healing hearth, the promise of things to come...
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (cascade)
There were clouds and fog and general overcastness this morning when I left for work. Wondrous damp air and cool temperatures. Ahhhhh.

Wow, do I have a lot to get done at work this week. I'd really like to not work late each night, and I need to take my cat to the vet as soon as I can schedule it. Back to work...
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (autumn bountiful harvest)
The harvest moon is on September 28th. That's a good reason to remember to come home on time Tuesday night.

I also want to remember to get home early enough in October for the full moon eclipse, which we ought to have a decent view of from the apartment starting at dusk. Alternatively, I'll end up on the roof of the building where I work, which is where I watched the last lunar eclipse I managed to see.

From links at Fusion Reaction, I found some interesting links for geek volunteerism, from geekcorps.org. Wow.

I'm checking and revising the offsite links in the sidebars on the shakal.org website and the shakal.livejournal.com journal this morning. I also have some webpage updates for shakal.org, but those come after the link-checking. I detest linkrot.

I'm a few days behindtimes, but upon reflection, I think I'm marking my own celebration of Mabon today. Looking forward, looking backward, noting what's left to finish (and start) before Samhain, and what to look forward to after it.

Maybe I'll make an apple pie or oatmeal cookies.
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (Default)
Dude! Dude! Water! From the sky!

I actually got hit by a couple of raindrops this morning!

Actual weather! In Pasadena!

Weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeiiiiiiiird.

;-)

Campus sure smells interesting when the plants get all damp.

And now back to work. Boy, howdy, is this time of year crazy.
naturedance: Caltech GeoChem BS, former ITS staffer, and member of Blacker Hovse (techer geek)
In general, things are going OK. :-)

The ginko trees on campus are a gorgeous shade of yellow, and are dumping their leaves into a fluttery carpet all around themselves. It's beautiful. And some white roses are blossoming over near Broad Cafe.

And, walking across campus, one can overhear fragments of conversations... two guys constantly interrupting each other as they walk...

"...yes, but if we just put a more powerful laser into it, that wouldn't be an issue..."

I had trouble keeping a straight face. *helpless mirth* Geeks!
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (Default)
I had a lovely Thanksgiving, and now I'm remembering similar warm, abundant-feeling Thanksgivings as a child. And that made me remember sitting around the kitchen table, writing out wishlists with my parents.

Yes, I wish for a better world, and an end to war and poverty and hunger, and all of the Big Philosophical Stuff that we should all wish for every day. But that's not what a Christmas wishlist is.. not to me, anyway.

Many wishes never come true, but that shouldn't make the wishing any more or less fun. There's a joy in hoping and anticipating and thinking about pie in the sky and winning the lottery and all of that sort of stuff. Especially around the winter holidays, when everything should be fireside-warm and sparkles and glittery and ornamented and toasty and smell like fresh-baked something-with-cinnamon.

I have a wishlist of things I want to do and give for co-workers, friends and family. That's a separate project wishlist, and one which is making me look at the calendar in startlement. When did December sneak up on me?

Anyway, here's my wishlist of things the universe might consider gifting to me, should it be so inclined... click here to read it )

Wow. Yeah, that pretty much gives an accurate impression of my life right now, huh? *grin*
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (cascade)
So after yesterday's adventure with the roses, I was slightly more alert than usual walking to my office this morning... and sure enough, there's an Agapanthus blossoming, tucked near the building next door to mine. They're also called Lily of the Nile, and they're planted in white and blue in great swaths across parts of campus.

This particular one must be quite confused; it's not the season for them. Usually they blossom in May/June here on campus... coincidentally (or not) right around Commencement.

A quick Googling shows the following pretty links.

http://www.agapanthus.info/ (gorgeous site!)
http://www.vanplant.co.nz/agapanthus.htm
http://www.clipartoday.com/flower/agapanthus01_poster.html

I love botany. Thanks, Mom and Dad.

The storm last night left a clear blue sky with frosty white cloud puffs chasing each other. If it weren't for all the damage done by as much water as came down at once in other parts of Los Angeles, I'd think the storm was really neat.
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (bountiful harvest)
It's officially fall... blustery clouds chase each other across the LA basin, and big white thunderheads broil up over the mountains. It rained sporadically in places overnight, and this morning the air is crisp and cool and bright unless you're actually under one of those clouds, in which case it's spritzling rain at you.

Between the parking garages and my office, there is all sorts of landscaping on campus. Today I happened to turn my head just enough to notice that in a little nook near one of the older buildings, there are roses blossoming. At least six different, beautiful colors.

I sidetracked myself, and after letting the bee go his merry way, stuck my nose into a peachy one with a deep yellow center. Its colors were so fresh and bright... and clear, shining drops of dew or rain from earlier in the morning glistened on the petals.

It smelled even better than it looked.

It's a beautiful day.
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (bountiful harvest)
So it went from being in the high 90s to being in the mid-50s, kind of overnight a few days back. I've had to break out my sweaters and long sleeved-shirts, and it feels strange to be wearing them.

It's time for hot cocoa, and hot tea, and hot spiced cider. It's time for warm, hearty soups and casseroles. It's time for wearing my fleecy lined slippers and my flannels around the apartment, since it's getting down to the low 40s at night.

It feels like winter. What happened to autumn?
naturedance: my foot, in my boot, on Mount Rainier (Default)
I find myself torn today between wanting to be with lots of people and wanting to be alone, either way marking the passage of time. It has been quite a year, and simultaneously both longer and shorter than I expected it to be. I may be posting more on that later... I'm also considering driving down into Los Angeles this weekend for the Dia De Los Muertos celebrations there, and if I do, I'll be posting about that here, too.

Happy Halloween and All Hallows Eve, and may you have a contemplative Samhain, folks. Whatever holidays you're celebrating this weekend (or even if you're simply celebrating TGIF), may they commemorate for you all that you wish of them.

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